“Archives of Human Sexuality and Identity”

Archives of Human Sexuality, the largest program available in support of the study sexuality and identity, enables scholars to make new connections in queer history and activism, cultural studies, psychology, health, political science, policy studies, and other related areas of research. Students, educators, and researchers can now engage with a vast resource that connects them to rare and unique documentation of this history, including newsletters, organizational papers, government documents, manuscripts, pamphlets, and other primary sources.”

Part 1 has just been published (Feb 2016), LGBTQ History and Culture since 1940.

Further info on the Gale website.

An article in The Advocate describes the Archives as:

“For LGBTQ people, printed media like The Advocate has had an important role in creating and fostering strong community ties. Now, some of the earliest periodicals and newsletters, which shaped the perceptions of relevant issues for the LGBTQ community while providing news and information on meetings, demonstrations, events, entertainment and even LGBTQ-friendly businesses — have been digitized, preserved and made available in The Archives of Human Sexuality and Identity, the largest digital archive on LGBTQ history and culture.”

“Preparing for LGBT History Month – our top tips”

Blogpost by Liz Chapman and John Vincent:

LGBT History Month – which is celebrated in February in the UK – is almost upon us! If you haven’t planned anything yet, it’s not too late to pull something together! Here are our top tips, based on Liz’s PhD research and John’s experience as a trainer and writer on diversity in libraries, as well as our personal experiences as queer library users. We’ve also included some longer-term ideas so that you can plan for next year, as well as for other queer-themed events and milestones that you can celebrate in the library. These might include Pride (usually held in the summer) and the 50th anniversary of the Sexual Offences Act 1967, which decriminalised (male) homosexuality.” [Excerpt]